Read Aloud Health Food Blog
Articles on health and food
Front page | Admin |
Sections
All
Annoucement
CT~ Cooking Methods
CT~ Fish
DT~ Slimming Tips
FREE
FT~ Eggs
FT~ Tomatoes
GOGO Drinks
How to write Blog?
HT ~ Acid Reflux
HT ~ Acne
HT ~ ADD
HT ~ Alcoholism
HT ~ Alzheimer
HT ~ Anemia
HT ~ Anxiety Disorder
HT ~ Arthritis
HT ~ Asthma
HT ~ Back Pain
HT ~ Bad Breath
HT ~ Blood Pressure
HT ~ Body Odor
HT ~ Brain
HT ~ Cancer
HT ~ Cerebral Palsy
HT ~ Child
HT ~ Cholesterol
HT ~ Coffee
HT ~ Constipation
HT ~ Depression
HT ~ Diabetes
HT ~ Eating Disorder
HT ~ Exercise
HT ~ Eyes
HT ~ Fatigue
HT ~ Feet
HT ~ Fibromyalgia
HT ~ Hair
HT ~ Headaches
HT ~ Heartburn
HT ~ High Blood Pressure
HT ~ Home Remedy
HT ~ IBS
HT ~ Insulin
HT ~ Kidney Stones
HT ~ Life
HT ~ Liver
HT ~ MD
HT ~ Memory Loss
HT ~ Migraine
HT ~ Optimum Health
HT ~ Protein
HT ~ Psoriasis
HT ~ Raw Food
HT ~ Remedies
HT ~ Rheumatism
HT ~ Scabies
HT ~ Shaving
HT ~ Skin
HT ~ Sleep
HT ~ Sleep Disorder
HT ~ Smoking
HT ~ Snoring
HT ~ Sperm
Ht ~ Stress
HT ~ Sweating
HT ~ Vinegar
HT ~ Water Retention
HT ~ Weight Loss
HT ~ Yoga
HT~ Acid Reflux
HT~ Acid-Alkaline
HT~ Acne
HT~ Addiction
HT~ Air
HT~ Allergies
HT~ Anemia
HT~ Anxiety
HT~ Arthritis
HT~ Asthma
HT~ Athritis
HT~ Austim
HT~ Babies
HT~ Baby
HT~ Back
HT~ Back Pain
HT~ Bad Breath
HT~ Baking
HT~ Balanced Diet
HT~ Bird Flu
HT~ Bodybuilding
HT~ Breast Cancer
HT~ Cancer
HT~ Cerebral Palsy
HT~ Child
HT~ Children
HT~ Cholera
HT~ Chronic Fatigue
HT~ Coconut Oil
HT~ Coffee
HT~ Cold
HT~ Cold Sores
HT~ Constipation
HT~ Cooking
HT~ Cough
HT~ Crohn
HT~ Dandruff
HT~ Depression
HT~ Diabetes
HT~ Diabetics
HT~ Diet
HT~ Diets
HT~ Disease
HT~ Diseases
HT~ Eating Disorder
HT~ Eczema
HT~ Elders
HT~ Exercise
HT~ Eye
HT~ Eyes
HT~ Fatigue
HT~ Fats
HT~ Flu
HT~ FMS
HT~ Food
HT~ Fruits
HT~ Graves Disease
HT~ Hair
HT~ Hair Loss
HT~ Hair removal
HT~ Headache
HT~ Headaches
HT~ Health Insurance
HT~ Healthcare
HT~ Heartburn
HT~ Herbs
HT~ Household Tip
HT~ Hygiene
HT~ Hypothyroidism
HT~ IBS
HT~ Incontinence
HT~ Insomnia
HT~ Joint
HT~ Joints
HT~ Lose Weight
HT~ Losing Weight
HT~ Massage
HT~ Melanoma
HT~ Menopause
HT~ Mental Problems
HT~ Mesothelioma
HT~ Milk
HT~ Muscle
HT~ Nail
HT~ Nail Fungus
HT~ Nails
HT~ Narcolepsy
HT~ Neck
HT~ Obesity
HT~ Optimum Health
HT~ pH Miracle
HT~ Pilates
HT~ Pregnancy
HT~ PTTD
HT~ Red Meat
HT~ Sciatica
HT~ Scoliosis
HT~ Skin
HT~ Skin Care
HT~ Sleep
HT~ Sleeping Disorder
HT~ Slimming
HT~ Slimming Diet
HT~ Smoking
HT~ Snoring
HT~ Stress
HT~ Syncope
HT~ Teeth
HT~ Thyroid
HT~ Thyroidism
HT~ Tinnitus
HT~ Tiredness
HT~ Vitamins
HT~ Wedding
HT~ Weight Gain
HT~ Weight Loss
HT~ Wine
HT~ Woman
HT~ Yeast
HT~ Yeast Infection
HT~ Yoga
HT~Acne
HT~Depression
R ~ Agar Agar
R ~ Cakes
R ~ Cappuccino
R ~ Cooking
R ~ Curries
R ~ Dessert
R ~ Drink
R ~ Fish
R ~ Food Tips
R ~ Italian
R ~ Main Dishes
R ~ Pets
R ~ Pizza
R ~ Pork
R ~ Root Beer
R ~ Smoothies
R ~ Snack
R ~ Snacks
R ~ Sweat
R ~ Thai
R ~ Wine
R ~Main Dishes
R~ Agar-Agar
R~ Agar-Agar (Low Fat Dessert)
R~ Beef
R~ Bread
R~ Cakes
R~ Casserole
R~ Chicken
R~ Chicken Quesadillas
R~ Chili
R~ Chocolate
R~ Christmas
R~ Coffee
R~ Cookies
R~ Dessert
R~ Dessert ~ Malay
R~ Desserts
R~ Diabetes
R~ Easy-To-Cook
R~ family food
R~ Food Recipes for Special Purpose
R~ Fruit Dessert
R~ Gelatine
R~ Gluten Free
R~ Healthy/Diet/Slimming Drinks
R~ Hot Dessert
R~ Ice Cream Recipes
R~ India
R~ Indian Food
R~ Irish
R~ Italian Food
R~ Jewish Food
R~ Kid Food
R~ Lamb
R~ Lasagna
R~ Light
R~ Low Carb Smoothies
R~ Main Dishes
R~ Microwave
R~ Nachos
R~ Pasta
R~ Pets
R~ Pies
R~ Pizza
R~ Pudding
R~ Pumpkin
R~ Rice
R~ Salad
R~ Salads
R~ Seafood
R~ Snacks
R~ Soup
R~ Steaks
R~ Stew
R~ Tacos
R~ Turkey
R~ Yogurt Low Fat Dessert
R~Cakes
R~Low Carb
R~Slow Cooker
T ~ Meditation
T ~ Mosquito
T ~ Oil
T~ Beer
T~ Beer Making
T~ Cakes
T~ Chicken
T~ Chocolate
T~ Chocolates
T~ Coffee
T~ Coffee Lovers
T~ Cooking
T~ Cooking Tips
T~ Cooking Utensils
T~ Diet
T~ Elder Care
T~ Festival
T~ Food
T~ Food Gifts
T~ Food Storage
T~ Grilling
T~ Hearing Aids
T~ Household Tips
T~ Indian Food
T~ Kids cooking
T~ Safety
T~ Sauna
T~ Soccer
T~ soya
T~ Valentine
T~ Vitamins
T~ Wine
T~Skin
Why I should write blog?
Archives
December 2005 (5)
January 2006 (27)
February 2006 (8)
March 2006 (13)
April 2006 (36)
May 2006 (16)
June 2006 (24)
July 2006 (23)
August 2006 (26)
September 2006 (26)
October 2006 (19)
November 2006 (14)
December 2006 (30)
January 2007 (28)
February 2007 (25)
March 2007 (25)
April 2007 (26)
May 2007 (31)
June 2007 (27)
July 2007 (28)
August 2007 (25)
September 2007 (29)
October 2007 (30)
November 2007 (28)
December 2007 (28)
January 2008 (27)
February 2008 (21)
March 2008 (28)
April 2008 (28)
May 2008 (28)
June 2008 (26)
July 2008 (26)
August 2008 (25)
September 2008 (26)
October 2008 (28)
November 2008 (25)
December 2008 (30)
January 2009 (29)
February 2009 (24)
March 2009 (26)
April 2009 (26)
May 2009 (12)
Search
Links
Smileys list
Terms & Conditions
Health Links 1
Health Links 2
Health Links 3
Health Links 4
Health Links 5
Measurement Conversion
Language
   

Read Articles To Me (Flash Reqired)

Other Talking Articles

Webmaster | 27. April 2008 @ 16:02

Millions of people around the world suffer from Asthma, a chronic lung condition characterized by difficulty in breathing. During an asthma attack, the sufferer�s airways become irritated and react by narrowing and constructing. That causes increased resistance to airflow, and obstructs the flow of the air to and from the lungs.

How is asthma treated?

Asthma is treated using two main types of medicines:

* Quick Relief Treatments: also called relievers. These give rapid, short-term treatment and are taken when you have worsening asthma symptoms that, left untreated, can lead to asthma episodes or attacks. You will feel the effects of these medicines within minutes.

* Long-Term Control Treatments: also called preventers, and are for people with persistent asthma, who need long-term control medicines. Preventers are taken every day, usually over long periods of time, to control chronic (long-term) symptoms and to prevent asthma episodes or attacks. You will feel the full effects of these medicines after taking them for a few weeks.

Drugs related to hormones

Drugs, such as those resembling two of our hormones, can help treat asthma. These two hormones are epinephrine (adrenaline in the UK) and hydrocortisone (a steroid). Epinephrine is pumped into our bloodstream when we have a sudden fright or emergency � psychologists often call this state fright or flight. Epinephrine is the quick-acting hormone from the middle of the adrenal glands near our kidneys. It makes your pulse race, your heart thump, and readies your body for emergency action. In asthma, the medicines which resemble adrenaline quickly relieve asthma for a short time, and are from the reliever family.

Hydrocortisone comes from the outer part of our adrenal glands, called the 'cortex'. It is also partly an �emergency hormone� but it works much more slowly, for much longer, and in a completely different way to adrenaline. Medicines which resemble hydrocortisone slowly allow the lining of air tubes in an asthma sufferer to become normal. As a result, your asthma becomes less severe and you are less likely to get asthma attacks. So these steroid medicines are part of the preventer family. Steroids are the most powerful preventers currently available.

Other long-term treatments include:

* Long-acting beta-agonists are bronchodilators, not anti-inflammatory drugs. These medicines are used to help control moderate and severe asthma and to prevent night-time symptoms. Long-acting beta-agonists are taken together with inhaled corticosteroids

* Leukotriene modifiers (such as montelukast, zafirlukast, and zileuton) are long-term control medicines used either alone to treat mild persistent asthma or together with inhaled corticosteroids to treat moderate persistent asthma or severe persistent asthma.

* Cromolyn and nedocromil are used to treat mild persistent asthma.

* Theophylline is used either alone to treat mild persistent asthma or together with inhaled corticosteroids to treat moderate persistent asthma. People who take theophylline should have their blood levels checked to be sure the dose is appropriate.

Be careful. If you stop taking long-term control medicines, your asthma will likely worsen again.

Taking preventers

Inhaled corticosteroids (or steroids for short) are the preferred treatment for controlling mild, moderate, and severe persistent asthma. They are safe when taken as directed by your doctor.

Inhaled medicines go directly into your lungs where they are needed. There are many kinds of inhalers that require different techniques, and it is important to know how to use your inhaler correctly.

Usually the best way to take these medicines is to breathe them in. That is, you inhale them, through your nose or mouth. The reasons you inhale them are: * because you need less of the medicine, * you won't suffer as many side effects, and, * the medicine works more quickly,

The final point is particularly important with the adrenaline-like, fast-acting relievers.

Another advantage is that the hydrocortisone-like steroid preventers you breathe in can be chosen to be biodegradable inside the body. As a result, then can do their work in the lung, but don't get much of a chance to produce any side effects in the rest of your body, because your liver breaks them down.

In some cases, steroid tablets or liquid are used for short times to bring asthma under control. The tablet or liquid form may also be used to control severe asthma.

Taking quick relief medicines

Quick relief medicines are used only when needed. A type of quick relief medicine is a short-acting inhaled bronchodilator. Bronchodilators work by relaxing the muscles that have tightened around the airways. They help open up airways quickly and ease breathing. They are sometimes called "rescue" or "relief" medicines because they can stop an asthma attack very quickly.

These medicines act quickly but their effects only last for a short period of time. You should take quick relief medicines when you first begin to feel asthma symptoms like coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, or shortness of breath. Anyone who has asthma should always carry one of these inhalers in case of an attack. For severe attacks, your doctor may also use steroids to treat the inflammation.

Work closely with your doctor

Many people with asthma need both a short-acting bronchodilator to use when symptoms worsen and long-term daily asthma control medication to treat the ongoing inflammation. Over time, your doctor may need to make changes in your asthma medication. You may need to increase your dose, lower your dose, or try a combination of medications. Be sure to work with your doctor to find the best treatment for your asthma. The goal is to use the least amount of medicine necessary to control your asthma.

Copyright 2006 David Drinkall

About the author:

David Drinkall is a life-long asthma sufferer and is the owner of AsthmaExperience.com - http://www.asthmaexperience.com. He takes both of the main families of drugs discussed in this article every day.

HT~ Asthma :: Comments (0) :: Link
Comments
No comments.
Comment this post
Title:
Health Guru : Understanding Asthma Treatments � Relievers and Preventers"/>


Text:

Your name:

Your e-mail: